Basic Chocolate Chip Cookie Recipe – How Each Ingredient Works

You will often hear, “My chocolate chip cookies did not turn out.” Inevitably it is then quickly blamed on the recipe used, and then the quest for a new recipe ensues. The odds are that the recipe used was just fine, but how the cookie ingredients were measured and mixed probably had more to do with the poor outcome.

There are so many recipes to choose from, it can be confusing. Each recipe will produce a similar tasting product, but depending on how the ingredients were used, each recipe will produce a cookie with its own set of textural characteristics and traits.

  • Butter: This is the fat that makes a cookie rich and palatable. Unsalted butter is the best to use as you can better control the salt amount in your recipe.
  • White and brown sugar: These sugars sweeten the cookie while also adding textural qualities. More brown sugar will make a soft chewy cookie while large amounts of white sugar will make a drier crispy cookie.
  • Eggs: Eggs are emulsifiers. This means that they help keep fats evenly distributed throughout the cookie making it thick and stable.
  • Extracts: Flavoring that give pastries a subtle underlying flavor. The most common extracts for a chocolate chip cookie are vanilla and almond.
  • All-Purpose flour: This is the most common flour found in the household kitchen, and the most recommended for baking cookies. The more flour used, the more dense the cookie. Self rising flour is not recommended.
  • Leavening agents: Baking powder and baking soda are the two most common gas producing agents that are used to make the cookie rise in the oven. Soda will produce a cookie that spreads more, as a double acting baking powder will make a fluffier cookie.
  • Salt: Salt actually enhances the sweetness and all the other flavors in the cookie. Sea salt is the best because it is a pure fine salt without additives.
  • Chocolate Chips: Semi-sweet chocolate chunks were in the first ever chocolate chip cookie, however, any flavor can be put into this classic cookie recipe.
  • Nuts: Nuts are optional in any cookie recipe, but add a crunchy texture and added layer of flavor. Walnuts and pecans are the most classic choice.

No matter which way you like your chocolate chip cookie, this is the most common set of ingredients that go into a basic recipe. Since the first cookie was made in 1933 there have been many alterations to the original recipe, but few recipes stray far from the tried and true classic list of ingredients.

Easy Sugar Cookie Recipes: From Delicious Drop Cookies To Fun, Tasty Cut-Outs

If you’re in the mood for something sweet, there are a lot of easy sugar cookie recipes to choose from. But sugar cookies come in all sorts of different shapes and sizes. They can be as simple as drop cookies, a spoonful of dough dropped onto a cookie sheet, or as elaborate as carefully cut-out cookies decorated with pretty, colorful icing.

So which one of those easy sugar cookie recipes should you pick? Which one will give you the best results for the type of sugar cookie you’re trying to make?

The truth is, most easy sugar cookie recipes use the same basic list of ingredients, with maybe an added spice here or there. What it really comes down to are the quantities of each ingredients, and how you treat the dough.

Each ingredient in a sugar cookie has a specific role, and tweaking its quantity will give you a slightly different cookie. So what goes in a sugar cookie?

  • Flour. Flour gives the cookie its structure. When you mix flour in liquids, it forms tough strands of gluten. The more you mix it, and the more flour you add, the tougher a cookie you get.
  • Butter. Butter doesn’t just add flavor. It also helps the cookie stay more tender by preventing too much gluten from forming. It also lets the cookie spread out more.
  • Sugar. Sugar helps the cookies be more fluffy by trapping air inside the butter when you cream it. Also, if you don’t cream it enough, the undissolved sugar will make the cookie spread out more.
  • Eggs. The yolks help make a more tender cookie, and the whites help give it structure. They also add some moisture.
  • Baking powder. Baking powder helps the cookie rise.
  • Baking soda. Baking soda makes the cookies brown faster, and makes the cookie more tender.
  • Vanilla. Vanilla is just there for flavor, but it really does make all the difference.
  • Salt. Like vanilla, the salt is just there for flavor, although it can toughen the cookie, too.

But it’s not just the ingredients that matter in easy sugar cookie recipes. How you handle the dough will affect what kind of cookie you get.

  • The longer you cream the butter and sugar, the fluffier a cookie you’ll get. It also won’t spread as much, perfect to help cut out cookies keep their shape.
  • The longer you mix the flour with the wet ingredients, the tougher a cookie you’ll get. If you’re looking for something fluffy, avoid over-mixing.
  • If you want to roll out the dough, you’ll need to refrigerate it until it’s firm enough to work with.
  • You can also refrigerate the raw cookies once they’re shaped. It helps them keep their shape in the oven.

When you’re baking, it’s always a good idea to start with a recipe. But once you have a decent recipe, you can tweak it to suit your tastes and purposes, and make your own easy sugar cookie recipes.

Cut Out Cookie Recipe Tips: How to Perfect the Holiday Sugar Cookie

Baking cut out cookies at Christmas is a time honored family tradition in many homes. Most of us have childhood memories of helping mom or grandma flour the counter tops, roll out the dough, and choose from an assortment of holiday shaped cookie cutters. It’s true that sugar cookie cut outs are quite simple to make, with most recipes consisting of fewer than six ingredients. However, regardless of the particular recipe you choose, there are a few basic principles that should go into making any type of cut out cookie recipe. In this article, we’ll discuss a few tips that will help you perfect the art of holiday sugar cookie cut outs.

First, follow your recipe to the letter. If it specifies butter at room temp, then make sure you soften your butter well in advance. If you forget, don’t think you can simply zap it in the microwave for a minute to make up for forgetting to soften it on the counter. It’s also important not to over-mix any dough recipe containing eggs, which most sugar cookie cut out recipes do contain.

Next, make sure your dough is adequately chilled. Most problems with cut out cookies occur because they are difficult to transfer from the counter top to the baking sheet. If this is true for you, it may be because your dough isn’t cold enough. It should be chilled in the refrigerator for a minimum of one hour.

Make sure you are using a good quality rolling pin, and for the best results, invest in rolling guides. These are simply rings that fit around each end of your rolling pin, ensuring that the dough will be rolled to an even thickness all over. If cut out cookies vary in thickness, which can easily happen to even the most accomplished baker if he or she isn’t using rolling guides on their pin, then they won’t bake evenly. Some cookies will come out of the oven too brown, while others will be under-baked and doughy.

Choose good quality cookie cutters. Opt for cutters made of metal as opposed to plastic, because they will hold their shape better while in use. Carefully transfer the cut out shapes to your baking sheets, making sure to leave enough space between them for some expansion in the oven. Next, call upon a little extra patience, and chill your baking sheet full of cookies in the freezer for about 15 minutes before you put them in the oven. This may seem fussy, but this one simple step is the trick to keeping the edges distinct and baking perfect cut out cookies. Don’t skip this step, even if you’re in a hurry.

If you own an oven thermometer, pop it in your oven to be sure you have exactly the right temp before putting your baking sheet in. It’s surprising how many ovens are off by as much as 10 to 15 degrees, which can make a significant difference in how baked goods turn out. Sugar cookie cut outs are done when the surface of the cookie springs back when lightly pressed, or when the edges are just beginning to brown.

When you remove the baking sheet from the oven, set it on top of a cooling rack for a minute or two before removing the cookies themselves to a cooling rack to cool completely. To store cooled cookies, place them in an airtight container, making sure to separate each layer with a piece of wax or parchment paper so they won’t stick together.

By following these simple steps, practically any cut out cookie recipe will yield beautiful results. So whether you’ve tried baking sugar cookies before with less than stellar results, or if you are a seasoned baker who makes cut out cookies ever year, try applying these basic steps to your favorite recipe and see what happens. You may turn out your best batch of sugar cookies yet!